Past Research

Leveraging big data to improve global health care quality

Faculty Member: Margaret Kruk

The major goals of the research group in Quality and Responsiveness of Global Health Systems are to develop novel metrics of health system quality in low- and middle-income countries and to investigate the determinants and consequences of poor quality to inform quality improvement interventions. We work with publicly available secondary data, such as Service Provision Assessment (SPA) surveys, and are currently undertaking a major analysis to identify more efficient metrics for health facility quality in low-and middle-income countries.

Caregiver-Reported Early Development Index (CREDI)

Faculty Member: Günther Fink

The primary aim of the Caregiver-Reported Early Development Index (CREDI) project is to develop population-level measure of early childhood development for children from birth to age three. In doing so, we hope to provide a tool that allows us to quantify children’s skills and needs across countries with the ultimate objective of making more informed decisions regarding ECD policies and resource allocation.

Aggression & Decision-Making

Faculty Member: Professor Joshua Buckholtz

We are interested in how and why people make poor cost-benefit decisions in order to harm others. For example, why might someone choose to hurt another person in a dispute when the consequences for this action loom large? This project will investigate how and why people make decisions to aggress using a series of behavioral tasks looking at traits such as aggression, decision-making, impulsivity, and cognitive flexibility.

The Representation of Dictators in Contemporary Arabic Literature

Faculty Member: Sami Alkyam

This project focuses on the manifestation/s of dictators and dictatorships in contemporary literary genres—the representation of its various configurations, and the politics of re/writing history. Specifically, the project focuses on contemporary Arabic novels that call attention to the parallel/s between narrative and the rhetorical processes and structures that once played a role in empowering dictators and helping them to create godly-like figures of themselves. Each literary work offers an articulation of history and history-making where it is conceived as a fluid narrative that is ideologically constructed through interaction, rejection, and recognition. The project focuses on opening a discussion on how novels can be read as tools of dissent against “Arab dictators” ongoing rhetorical self-empowering over their own people and nations.

What Determines the Content of Political Ads? Evidence From the 2012 Mexican Presidential Election

Faculty Member: Professor Horacio Larreguy

In this project we want to understand what determines the content of political ads. To that end, we have coded the content of the universe of political ads that were used in radio and television in the 2012 Mexican presidential and legislative elections.

Reducing Academic Inequalities Among Diverse Adolescents

Faculty Member: Professor Nancy Hill

The project is based in a partnership between our research team at Harvard Graduate School of Education & Boston College and a local school district. We are focused on understanding how to improve academic achievement and close demographic gaps in achievement by identifying ways to increase students’ connections to school, engagement in school, and help youth understand how school and education will assist them in pursuing their goals.

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