Middle East

The Representation of Dictators in Contemporary Arabic Literature

Faculty Member: Sami Alkyam

This project focuses on the manifestation/s of dictators and dictatorships in contemporary literary genres—the representation of its various configurations, and the politics of re/writing history. Specifically, the project focuses on contemporary Arabic novels that call attention to the parallel/s between narrative and the rhetorical processes and structures that once played a role in empowering dictators and helping them to create godly-like figures of themselves. Each literary work offers an articulation of history and history-making where it is conceived as a fluid narrative that is ideologically constructed through interaction, rejection, and recognition. The project focuses on opening a discussion on how novels can be read as tools of dissent against “Arab dictators” ongoing rhetorical self-empowering over their own people and nations. Read more about The Representation of Dictators in Contemporary Arabic Literature

African-American Responses to Stigmatization

Faculty Member: Professor Michele Lamont

Description: The research is focused on how the repertoires of strategies for responding to stigmatization vary with group identity, the porousness of group boundaries, available cultural repertoires, and other factors. Researchers are finalizing a book based on this data, as well as on similar data on stigmatized groups in Brazil and Israel.

Work in collaboration with Professor Michele Lamont's team. This involves helping a research team conduct a range of tasks related to delivering the book (finalizing tables,

Read more about African-American Responses to Stigmatization